By lance weiler, January 15th, 2008

I’m pleased to introduce a new contributor to the Workbook Project. Kfir Pravda is a marketer, content creator and blogger. His blog “Media, Technology and Rebel Filmmaking” is read and quoted by investors, venture capitalists, CEOs of technology companies, content creators and bloggers.

Kfir reports – In the past things were clear – broadcast television required a specific level of production. Lighting, sound, camera quality – all were parts of the definition.

Not only that “fit to broadcast” affected quality of TV images and videos – it also affected the cost per production minute of TV material. This, coupled with ownership of screens and TV channels created a high barrier of entry to new players in the video and TV market.

YouTube, mobile phones, and citizen journalism changed it all. These three factors made sure that poor quality video crossed the boundaries of the Internet to prime time TV. The average TV viewer is used to seeing poor quality video, taken with low end mobile phones video cameras or web cams, as part of news flashes and entertainment shows.

But why are these grainy and pixelated low quality videos on broadcast TV? Because they tell a good story. Whether it is a Tsunami footage, extra funny lipsync, or unique view on a hot topic, viewers are willing to see low quality footage in case it is a high quality story.

In a past post I’ve argued that viewers are willing to accept low production quality in exchange for a good story. The fact that we take for granted YouTube clips on news flashes proves this point.

Therefore, a creator without a dime, that has limited resources, should remember that production value, though important, is just part of the equation. Great story, timely news flash, in-depth analysis, and believable characters are crucial for success, much more than HD camera, and great effects.

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Kfir Pravda – a marketer, blogger, and content creator. His blog “Media, Technology and Rebel Filmmaking” is read and quoted by investors, venture capitalists, CEOs of technology companies, content creators and bloggers. He often moderates and participates in industry panels discussing telecom and media topics and writes for a major Israeli newspaper. His customers are publicly traded companies interested in improving their market position by utilizing social media tools and innovative marketing solutions. Kfir also serves as VP of Marketing of IMTC, an international consortium of blue chip and startup companies, cooperating on promoting video technologies by interoperability and fostering open standards. Organization members are, among others, Nokia, Ericsson, Polycom, Apple and Cisco. Loves crime films, single malt Whisky and his shiny new Mac.

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Posted in biz content online producing production resource tech tv vid web 2.0

lance weiler is the founder of the WorkBook Project and also a story architect of film, tv and games. He's written and directed two feature films THE LAST BROADCAST and HEAD TRAUMA. He's currently developing a number of transmedia projects

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  • Congrats on the great reactions to your film - I can't wait to see it, I love the poster :)

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