By Jason Hood, October 23rd, 2011

New York-based creative professionals take note! Odds are, you’re familiar with 3rd Ward, the massive workspace in Bushwick full of all sorts of resources, supplies and classes for any creative project that interests you, from woodworking to filmmaking. And if not I just told you the gist of it, so there you go.

But aside from being a great place to learn, create, and promote all sorts of great DIY projects, their newest addition now also makes it a great place to work. Dubbed a “coworking space,” it’s a modern, bright, airy office designed for collaborating as well as solo work, full of shared desks, personal workstations, conference rooms, plenty of brand new iMacs, free wifi and printing, and of course, free coffee. All of it’s designed for any smart creative freelancer, startup or telecommuter who wants to have a place to get their work done while networking with other like-minded people. You can even meet clients and have business mail delivered there.

At the heart of all of this, though, is collaboration. The nice thing about 3rd Ward is that it provides the perfect environment for creativity: step inside and you’re surrounded by people in all sorts of different crafts from all sorts of different backgrounds, and everyone has ideas flowing. A graphic designer may not realize they can get inspiration from a welder until it happens, and these sorts of things happen all the time at 3rd Ward.

And of course, we wouldn’t recommend anything unless we’ve seen and experienced it ourselves; 3rd Ward has given Workbook Project a space to shoot at least one RADAR episode, and we also partnered with them for Inside Design as well.

Learn more about the new coworking space HERE.

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Posted in NYC community creative collaboration cross-media diy

Jason Hood a recent graduate of the University of Texas, he once co-produced Local Live and The Austin Sessions, a radio-slash-TV show and webseries, respectively, that focused on Austin’s famous independent music scene. He’s also directed a number of 16mm short films, and had a diverse and bizarre series of paid jobs ranging from librarian to travel blogger.

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  • Great stuff. Amazing how the landscape has changed. Reading interviews from independent filmmakers just ten years ago expressed their frustration at distribution companies but they had little recourse. I find it encouraging that these guys feel that self-distribution, given the time and inclination, may actually prove to be a greater source of income than traditional distribution methods for smaller, truly independent projects.

    Plus, the insight on building up momentum for your projects by promoting within small niche audiences to combine into a successful screening was also invaluable.

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