By Jason Hood, October 23rd, 2011

New York-based creative professionals take note! Odds are, you’re familiar with 3rd Ward, the massive workspace in Bushwick full of all sorts of resources, supplies and classes for any creative project that interests you, from woodworking to filmmaking. And if not I just told you the gist of it, so there you go.

But aside from being a great place to learn, create, and promote all sorts of great DIY projects, their newest addition now also makes it a great place to work. Dubbed a “coworking space,” it’s a modern, bright, airy office designed for collaborating as well as solo work, full of shared desks, personal workstations, conference rooms, plenty of brand new iMacs, free wifi and printing, and of course, free coffee. All of it’s designed for any smart creative freelancer, startup or telecommuter who wants to have a place to get their work done while networking with other like-minded people. You can even meet clients and have business mail delivered there.

At the heart of all of this, though, is collaboration. The nice thing about 3rd Ward is that it provides the perfect environment for creativity: step inside and you’re surrounded by people in all sorts of different crafts from all sorts of different backgrounds, and everyone has ideas flowing. A graphic designer may not realize they can get inspiration from a welder until it happens, and these sorts of things happen all the time at 3rd Ward.

And of course, we wouldn’t recommend anything unless we’ve seen and experienced it ourselves; 3rd Ward has given Workbook Project a space to shoot at least one RADAR episode, and we also partnered with them for Inside Design as well.

Learn more about the new coworking space HERE.

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Posted in NYC community creative collaboration cross-media diy

Jason Hood a recent graduate of the University of Texas, he once co-produced Local Live and The Austin Sessions, a radio-slash-TV show and webseries, respectively, that focused on Austin’s famous independent music scene. He’s also directed a number of 16mm short films, and had a diverse and bizarre series of paid jobs ranging from librarian to travel blogger.

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  • To retrofilms' comment - Overall it has been an amazing experience both times (TLB and HT). I don't mean to sound down on the theatrical element - in the end the box office has been about 20k to date for HT and TLB did about 40k. The theatrical was positioned for press and promotion to help with DVD sales, world and TV sales which it has. I'm hoping to make the workbook the quintessential guide to what I and others have done to get their movies out - showing the pros and the cons. The one that is for sure is that there is no ONE way to get the work out.

    To phauer's commnet - It's interesting that you reference Cameron. He is currently developing a number of MMOGs (massive multiplayer online game) that will be used to promote and develop an audience around some of his new films. Interesting times...

  • So Lance, after everything you've experienced (both good and bad) with your own DIY Theatrical run, would you do it again? If so, what would you do different?

  • Dang Lance, you are one creative promoter. I love your ideas. And I think that the cinema is going through the same pains it felt at the advent of television. In the end, however, I think, all things being equal, people prefer watching films to be a communal, shared experience. There's an energy that the audience can provide that can never be replicated, even if you in your own home, in your own home theater with the best projection and sound.

    For example, films that were greatly augmented by the audience experience for me were Rear Window, Fatal Attraction, Napoleon Dynamite, Raiders of the Lost Ark and Poltergeist, to name a few. I think the next few years will be a lean transitory period for cinema and multi-events such as yours that bring various areas of interest to a viewing will be required while the technology, distribution streams and eventual merging of television and downloadable on-demand programming off of the internet finally reach stability.

    Either Cameron's fancy-dancy 3-D cinema vision will reinvent the cinema demand or maybe they'll still be theaters, but smaller, niche theaters that show niche product to like-minded viewers. Or something else entirely. Either way, it sure is an interesting time.

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