By robert pratten, December 16th, 2010

Welcome to Transmedia Talk a new podcast covering all things story. Transmedia Talk is co-hosted by Nick Braccia and Robert Pratten and looks to shed light on the topic of transmedia storytelling with commentary, interviews and tips on how storytelling is moving into the 21st century.

Download Adobe Flash Player.

download

Or Subscribe iTunes

NB: If you’d like to give  us feedback, recommend yourself as a guest or suggest topics to cover – please email us at talk@workbookproject.com or Tweet away with the hashtag #tmediatalk

Hosts
Nick Braccia from Culture Hacker
Robert Pratten from TransmediaStoryteller.com

Guests
Jeff Gomez of Starlight Runner

Running Time

01:14 Origins and early experiences

12:00 The Storybible

12:45 Working with Clients

16:40 Understanding the value-proposition at the contract stage

20:20 Types of client

21:45 Removing barriers from transmedia narratives

25:50 Conflicts between writer and producer

28:00 Market development for the role of Transmedia Producers

33:40 Organisation and staffing at Starlight Runner

41:50 Does narrative get diluted as it is spread across platforms?

49:50 Growing an audience across platforms

55:00 Implementing transmedia internationally

58:12 Transmedia misperceptions

1:00:00 Growth of transmedia

1:06:00 New transmedia example (LowLifes) and Industry Discussion.

1:18:00 End

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Posted in Transmedia Talk arg audience-building cross-media marketing podcast storytelling transmedia

robert pratten Robert Pratten is CEO and Founder of Transmedia Storyteller Ltd, an audience engagement company and provider of Conducttr, an pervasive entertainment platform. He has more than 20 years experience as an international marketing consultant and has established himself as a thought-leader in the field of transmedia storytelling. He is author of the first practical book transmedia storytelling: Getting Started in Transmedia Storytelling: A Practical Guide for Beginners. http://twitter.com/robpratten

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By robert pratten, December 8th, 2010

Welcome to Transmedia Talk a new podcast covering all things story. Transmedia Talk is co-hosted by Nick Braccia and Robert Pratten and looks to shed light on the topic of transmedia storytelling with commentary, interviews and tips on how storytelling is moving into the 21st century.

Download Adobe Flash Player.

download

Or Subscribe iTunes

NB: If you’d like to give  us feedback, recommend yourself as a guest or suggest topics to cover – please email us at talk@workbookproject.com or Tweet away with the hashtag #tmediatalk

Hosts
Nick Braccia from Culture Hacker
Robert Pratten from TransmediaStoryteller.com

Guests
Nathan Mayfield, co-founder of transmedia storytellers Hoodlum.

Hoodlum are well know for thier work with such shows as Fast Forward, Spooks (MI5), Emerdale & Lost. At the time of recording they’re in production on a new show called Slide to be release in Australia on pay channel Fox8.tv in 2011

Interview with Nathan Mayfield, co-founder of transmedia storytellers Hoodlum.Hoodlum are well know for thier work with such shows as Fast Forward, Spooks (MI5), Emerdale & Lost. At the time of recording they’re in production on a new show called Slide to be released in Australia on pay channel Fox8.tv in 2011

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Posted in Transmedia Talk audience-building cross-media podcast transmedia

robert pratten Robert Pratten is CEO and Founder of Transmedia Storyteller Ltd, an audience engagement company and provider of Conducttr, an pervasive entertainment platform. He has more than 20 years experience as an international marketing consultant and has established himself as a thought-leader in the field of transmedia storytelling. He is author of the first practical book transmedia storytelling: Getting Started in Transmedia Storytelling: A Practical Guide for Beginners. http://twitter.com/robpratten

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By Janine Saunders, November 4th, 2010

This November Distribution U returns with a stops in NYC and LA. The day long event provides a crash course in distribution and audience building. We caught up with Scott Kirsner co-founder of Distribution U to get his take on interesting trends, projects and services that are doing innovative things in the space.

WBP: What are some of the interesting trends you’re paying attention to within tech that could benefit filmmakers?

Scott Kirsner: Obviously, iPhone apps and Android apps continue to be huge. I think filmmakers collaborating with software developers (maybe at a local college) holds a lot of promise. And I just heard about a new startup called Groundcrew that’s doing neat stuff around helping you coordinate activities for people in your social networks — actually getting them to do things in the real world and participate using their mobile phones.

WBP You cover the tech industry with a focus on start-ups. How could filmmakers learn from start-ups? What are some of the takeaways that would directly apply to filmmaking?

SK: I think many start-ups try to build something cheap and simple — a prototype, or a “minimally viable product” — and then get feedback on it from the market. That’s antithetical to the way many filmmakers work, raising and spending lots of money on something, finishing it, and then seeing what people think. I’m not an advocate for letting the Internet community write your script (thought that could work for some projects), but I do think there are creative ways to get input from your target audience earlier in the process.

WBP: If you were sitting down to write Fans, Friends & Followers now what would you include that you didn’t in previous editions?

SK: Probably more examples of people who’ve not only created big networks on Twitter or Facebook, but actually used them to get people to do something, whether it’s buying an iTunes download or a t-shirt or showing up for a screening. There’s a big gap between “friending” or “following” someone and taking an action.

WBP: What do you think our the top 5 things for filmmakers to consider when taking their film to market?

SK: Oh man, I’m not sure I have a top 5 list all baked and ready to hand you. But one thing that very few films do is show they’ve built up a potential audience — a following — online before they get to their first festival, or start talking to distributors. Showing that you’ve generated 50,000 views on a YouTube channel or 5,000 Twitter followers can give you more leverage in any negotiation, since it’s a promotional platform that you can use when you launch the film.


Iron Sky

WBP What are interesting projects that you’re seeing that are doing innovative things with distribution and audience building? Can you share some links?

SK: Well, I like how much Tiffany Shlain has been giving presentations and public talks in advance of her next doc, “Connected.” She has also been posting footage and montages from the film on YouTube. I think she has some innovative distribution ideas once it gets into festivals next year. (http://www.connectedthefilm.com/Connectedthefilm/About.html) I’m also curious to see what Timo Vuorensola has up his sleeve with “Iron Sky,” where he has raised north of 300,000 Euros through crowdfunding. And I was really impressed by all of the outreach that “Winnebago Man” did to influential blogs, and what they’re doing with DVD and t-shirt sales online.

WBP: What is distribution u and why now?

SK: We did the first one last November, at USC in Los Angeles. It was a first attempt to really collect and present examples of how filmmakers have been successfully taking control of their marketing and distribution strategy, and connecting directly with an audience. That one sold out, and people seemed to think it was really helpful, in terms of helping them make new connections and think through what they would do for their next project. The New York Times did a big piece on it, too. Obviously, a lot more has happened since last November, so these two Distribution U. events will present more recent data points, and also dive in a bit deeper to crowdfunding, where we’ve seen people having more success in the last year.

For those interested in attending Distribution U see the following links

Links to register:

New York, Nov 13th:
Distribution U – NYC

LA, Nov 20th
Distribution U – LA

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Posted in audience audience-building distribution

Janine Saunders is a producer, media collaborator, and DJ living in NYC.  She has worked as a producer since a very early age, in music, video and publishing. She has worked closely with writer/ documentarian/ graphic novelist Douglas Rushkoff, and directed and edited Life Inc: The Movie.

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By robert pratten, November 4th, 2010

Welcome to Transmedia Talk a new podcast covering all things story. Transmedia Talk is co-hosted by Nick Braccia and Robert Pratten and looks to shed light on the topic of transmedia storytelling with commentary, interviews and tips on how storytelling is moving into the 21st century.

Download Adobe Flash Player.

download

Or Subscribe iTunes

NB: If you’d like to give  us feedback, recommend yourself as a guest or suggest topics to cover – please email us at talk@workbookproject.com or Tweet away with the hashtag #tmediatalk

Hosts
Nick Braccia from Culture Hacker
Robert Pratten from TransmediaStoryteller.com

Guests
Mathew Toner of Zeros2Heroes tells us about AreYouWake.tv
Haley Moore tells us about Haunted Majora’s Mask

Timing

0:50 AreYouWake

27:45 Haunted Majora’s Mask based on the Nintendo game Legend of Zelda for the N64

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Posted in Transmedia Talk arg audience-building community podcast transmedia video

robert pratten Robert Pratten is CEO and Founder of Transmedia Storyteller Ltd, an audience engagement company and provider of Conducttr, an pervasive entertainment platform. He has more than 20 years experience as an international marketing consultant and has established himself as a thought-leader in the field of transmedia storytelling. He is author of the first practical book transmedia storytelling: Getting Started in Transmedia Storytelling: A Practical Guide for Beginners. http://twitter.com/robpratten

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By Chloe Stites, October 28th, 2010

Segment II: Why is Collapsus an example of a transmedia project? How is this a useful tool?

The concept of transmedia is grounded in the delivery and curation of specific information across various platforms. As compared with traditional media’s pattern of distribution (the same set of images relayed to viewers repeatedly through the same modes of communication) the innovation of transmedia is grounded in choice: developing successful projects means inspiring viewers to follow subject matter from one media platform to another. Information is provided as a reward, acting as an agent of incentive to produce sustained interest within the viewer. These “messages” act as a resource independent to a greater whole. (Culture Hacker: Transmedia Storytelling Getting Started) Content, therefore, has the capacity to enrich the spread of entertainment across multiple platforms.

Segment II of this blog series will examine what platforms the brand-new, transmedia project, Collapsus utilized. The distribution of factoids within this project highlights the benefits of using alternative methods to expand a project’s reach beyond traditional audiences.

A basic breakdown of existing communication reveals reading, listening, interaction, and watching to be the modern foundation of possible sensory content application. Reading (books, comics, ebooks), listening (radio, mobile, online), interaction (online, mobile, social, console, ARG) and watching (TV, theatre, mobile, live performance, online) are all media sources useful in releasing information and encouraging viewers to seek further analysis. (Henry Jenkins: Transmedia Education)

Inspiring viewers to self-reflect in the context of a project’s subject matter is directly related to the availability of information within a transmedia project. In Collapsus, “visitors to the Collapsus site can cut away from soap-opera-like webisodes to learn about energy issues through an interactive map, view fictional newscasts on the Citizenergy Channel, or watch real interview clips with experts, analysts, activists and journalists.” (Mq2: Collapsus)

Executing platforms that support and encourage choice is imperative in creating and sustaining viewer interactivity. As the sole content provider, producers control exactly what information is released, at what time, and to which audience; they guide the story (or project) as it unfolds. What exactly does this mean? It speaks to the nucleus of the transmedia experience: widened exposure equals more choice, and, more choice equals widened exposure. This implies a need to thoroughly understand one’s projected audience: who would be most interested in this material? What are the best modes of communication for conveying this on multiple media platforms?

Collapsus was produced with the goal of exposing a broader audience to the information found in the traditional documentary, Energy Risk, released by VPRO. See the original doc HERE

With an idea of audience in mind, creators and producers of the project conceptualized a multi-linear experience that blended genres of documentary, animation, fiction, and interactivity. Producer Tommy Pallotta explains, “This hybrid approach allows us to look at a serious documentary subject, but also to shift from the usual talking head approach to something that better reflects our time.”(MQ2: Collapsus)

Citizenergy, the Youtube channel for the original Dutch documentary, compliments the transmedia project, Collapsus: The Energy Risk Conspiracy, and is an example of this approach to media multi-tasking. (See the channel HERE) The CitizEnergyChannel provides several video segments linked to Collapsus’ theme of risk; clips provide expert analysis on the danger of a growing dependency on fossil fuels. Each video on Citizenergy is packaged content, the producer actively chose what was delivered to audiences. Utilizing Youtube and other video sharing sites give a lot of information to viewers, while allowing them to review at their convenience.

In transmedia projects the audience must chose to further his/her knowledge through exploring subject matter, playing games, and chatting with others. The endeavor of exploring a specific topic through various media can inspire a “community” culture of individuals working with a cohesive goal. When players are able to pool their knowledge with others, audience capacity multiplies. For Collapsus, this directly relates to the project’s undertone of social responsibility. As players and viewers interact with the material, they consult each other on personal methods to approach content. This allows for alternative modes of thinking, and the development of a furthered sense of self in a global community. A global community means increased global communication and a wider audience.

In researching the intersection of education and transmedia I came across an example of a school in Texas that utilized multiple media platforms to integrate education and technology. On August 22, 2009 in Rio de Janeiro, NAVE (Ncleo Avanado em Educao – Advanced Education Center ) a Brazilian high school, hosted Heroes and Smallville’s associate producer Mark Warshaw to teach a lesson on Transmedia Storytelling. The event was live streamed and interactive, as the audience, both live and online, participated in an interactive SMS game. The release of the Descolagem App later that day furthered the audiences span. The audience was literally guided through a lesson on transmedia storytelling through an actual transmedia experience. Beto Largman, who curated the event, hopes the format of the lesson displays the process as a resource; a strategy evolved to distribute content personally to a mass audience. (Transmedia Experience Streamed At Highschool )

The choice to pursue more components of a project is the apex of transmedia success. The interactive component of Collapsus’ narrative is directly linked with the information provided by the clips on Youtube. Soap-opera-like webisodes, an interactive map, fictional newscasts, along with the Citizenergy Channel, provide players with a platform of knowledge on the energy crisis, which gives them the ability, and inspiration, to interact within the overall narrative of the game. The goal clearly defined: Reviewing Collapsus for Public Radio Makers Quest 2.0, Julie Drizin states, “Truthfully, this is the kind of media that is better experienced than explained.”
Experience Collapsus HERE.

Director of Collapsus, Tommy Pallotta, will be interactively interviewed in Pt2:
Investigating the Possibilities of Transmedia; Collapsus, a Case Study.

Interview questions will come directly from reader comments to Tommy- the questions and his responses will be included in next weeks feature. Previously, he produced Waking Life, the first independently financed and computer animated feature produced, as well as A Scanner Darkly, and a multitude of other projects. Let’s delve into his animation process of rotoscoping, and understand how imperative it is to develop successful visual reaction in transmedia and cross-media projects.

Email any questions to Tommy: work@workbookproject.com
Please subject with: Tommy Pallotta questions

Source Links
1. http://workbookproject.com/culturehacker/2010/07/07/transmedia-storytelling-getting-started/
2. http://henryjenkins.org/2010/06/transmedia_education_the_7_pri.html
3. http://www.mq2.org/Collapsus
4. http://www.hastac.org/blogs/nancykimberly/transmedia-experience-livestreamed-brazilian-high-school

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Posted in audience-building cross-media design storytelling transmedia

Chloe Stites grew up in the Florida Keys. An avid reader of everything print and digital, she favors lyrical writing and Murakami-esque sentences. She currently lives in Brooklyn, New York.

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