By lance weiler, February 26th, 2008

M dot Strange reports – This was part of a presentation called “Adventures in self distribution” I describe the journey I took with my animated feature film “We are the Strange” From my bedroom to Sundance and beyond and back to my little studio again after turning down Hollywood deals and deciding to self distribute and make my films my way.


M dot Strange: Berlin Talent Campus 08 from M dot Strange on Vimeo.mdot.jpg

M dot Strange is a mixed media animator from San Jose, Ca. He recently singlehandedly completed an 88 minute animated film entitled “We are the Strange” which made its world premiere in January of this year at the Sundance Film Festival. A reviewer that saw the film M dot made in his bedroom with 9 PC’s over the course of 3 years said “it looked like something Hollywood would make for 70 million” He has recently been featured in the NY Times, ABC World News , Wired.com and his youtube videos have been viewed over a million times.

Find out more about M dot Strange and his work
www.wearethestrange.com

  • Share/Bookmark
Posted in animation audience biz case study community content crowdsourced deals discovery distro diy dvd education embed funds gaming how to online promotion remix resource sharing user-gen vid vidsocial web 2.0

lance weiler is the founder of the WorkBook Project and also a story architect of film, tv and games. He's written and directed two feature films THE LAST BROADCAST and HEAD TRAUMA. He's currently developing a number of transmedia projects

RELATED
By lance weiler, January 29th, 2008

Tom Quinn reports – I flew home to Philly on Saturday and brought a wicked cold with me so am behind on this post, but we had some great news this weekend: The New Year Parade took the Grand Jury Prize for Best Narrative at Slamdance 2008!! We couldn’t be more thrilled or humbled. Some terrific reviews went up this week as well:

VARIETY: “Because Quinn encourages his actors to improvise, sometimes recording hours of footage to be condensed into a short scene, the narrative style takes some getting used to at first. Grocery shopping or band practice are weighted as equally as heated arguments and sex scenes, providing an unusually well-rounded sense of character even as it makes for a rather inelegant flow. Scenes don’t have obvious in and out points, but instead seem sampled from lives that continue when the cameras stop rolling”

INDIEWIRE: “Talented director Tom Quinn (no relation to the Magnolia Pictures exec) makes a stunning debut with this sterling observation of a brother and sister pair straining under the pressures of their parents’ divorce. Quinn has a calculated, Altman-esque approach to staging conflict. Because it functions as a wise examination of universal human despair, “The New Year Parade” proves that keen observation of human behavior yields the strongest results–although budgetary requirements probably hold a close second place spot.”

FILMMAKER MAGAZINE BLOG: “New Year’s Parade brims with wonderful glimpses of spaces the cinema rarely visits. Quinn, whose deftness with performers equals his eye for authentic detail, uses real South Philly marching bands, has his characters visit Geno’s Steaks and depicts the unraveling of the family against the backdrop of the implosion of Veteran’s Stadium, incorporating into the film a series of places and cultural events that resonate in this working class milieu. (The New Year Parade) with its flat narrative, subtle sensitivity to class, gently crafted performances by non or marginal actors and its rough hewn yet entirely appropriate hand held camerawork, does many of the things American Independent films have traditionally done well.”

So obviously, we are pretty psyched! It also is a reminder that roughly a year ago I found out about the IFP Narrative Rough Cut Labs through The Workbook Project. Submissions for this year’s lab are about to open up so I would strong encourage anyone with a feature in postproduction to visit www.ifp.org/labs for more information. The Lab experience was the turning point for The New Year Parade – we wouldn’t be where we are now otherwise.

tq.jpg

Tom Quinn grew up in Bucks County, PA, where he directed his first feature, Lusting for Dust Words, several shorts, and freelanced as a camera assistant. His film, Via Bicycles, was a 2006 Eastman Scholars finalist and received a Motion Picture Association Award. His current feature film, The New Year Parade, was one of ten projects selected for the 2007 IFP Narrative Rough Cut Labs. He is currently working toward his MFA at Temple University.

  • Share/Bookmark
Posted in BTS biz diy festivals screening

lance weiler is the founder of the WorkBook Project and also a story architect of film, tv and games. He's written and directed two feature films THE LAST BROADCAST and HEAD TRAUMA. He's currently developing a number of transmedia projects

RELATED
  • DIY list #5
    * PROJECTS 10MPH is a DIY doc by Hunter Weeks and Josh Caldwell. Shot over the course of a 100 days, the doc details Hunter and Josh’s search for the American Dream. Made with limited resources and a small crew, 10MPH has enjoyed a nice run on the festival circuit prior to a DIY theatrical tour and DVD release this… read more
  • BTS Road to Park City – Frayed Ends
    Tom Quinn reports – When the call came in for Slamdance, we were initially caught off guard. I had submitted a very rough cut in September and assumed we’d be passed over. I planned to lock picture in December, affording a few months to mix the film and wrap any loose ends before the spring festival slate. Fortunately, the programmers… read more
  • DIY list #4
    OpenSourceCinema.org is a collaborative documentary project to create a feature film about copyright in the digital age. The film entitled, Basement Tapes is a crowdsourced doc that welcomes submissions from the community mixed with footage shot around the world by a traditional crew. WHY: Projects like OSC and A Swarm of Angels are new models in production and distribution. They… read more
By lance weiler, January 24th, 2008

pod.jpg

This edition of TCIBR is brought to you by IndieFlix and Breakthrough Distribution – Over the holiday break we recorded two editions of TCIBR that looked back on 2007 and forward to 2008. In part one we took a look at the year in digital entertainment. In part two we focus on films and distribution trends. Mark Stolaroff of the No Budget Film School and Paul Harrill of Self Reliant join us for a discussion about interesting DIY projects and emerging trends from 2007.

poddown.jpg podsub.jpg digpodbutton.gif itunes.gif
To listen NOW click the play button below.

Download Adobe Flash Player.

Download Adobe Flash Player.

  • Share/Bookmark
Posted in audio biz content digital downloads discussion distro diy doc festivals podcast production roundtable theatrical

lance weiler is the founder of the WorkBook Project and also a story architect of film, tv and games. He's written and directed two feature films THE LAST BROADCAST and HEAD TRAUMA. He's currently developing a number of transmedia projects

RELATED
By lance weiler, January 22nd, 2008

So, we’ve been in Park City for five days now and my head is spinning. We premiered the film on Saturday and had a great crew in town: Jen Welsh, who plays Kat, Greg Lyons, who plays Jack, my finance Beth, high school pal Tom Bilotta, and Greg’s ECC bandmate, Josh Ostrander. Of course, 10AM on a Saturday is a difficult slot – especially after a ton of great parties Friday night. The film looked and sounded great, thanks to hard work of the Slamdance projection crew. The response was incredible – so many amazing comments after and questions for the cast. Jen and Greg did a fantastic job in the Q&A and really captured their experiences as first time actors now in Park City.

On Sunday morning, Greg and Josh hit the road for their tour while Beth and Jenny caught their flight back to Philly. Meanwhile, Irene Longshore, who plays Julie, flew in and we hit the town with Tom Bilotta to spread the word for Tuesday’s screening. However, when we arrived that the Treasure Mountain Inn we saw:

Three days before our screening and it was already sold out! Everyone we spoke to on Sunday had already heard great things about the film – the small Saturday crowd had been talking us up! By Sunday evening the phone was ringing and we began setting up meetings with interested parties.

So, right now, my head is spinning but the news is all good. Speaking of which, we have 2 very cool announcements to make in the next month….

I’ll touch base after tomorrow’s screening.

tq.jpg

Tom Quinn grew up in Bucks County, PA, where he directed his first feature, Lusting for Dust Words, several shorts, and freelanced as a camera assistant. His film, Via Bicycles, was a 2006 Eastman Scholars finalist and received a Motion Picture Association Award. His current feature film, The New Year Parade, was one of ten projects selected for the 2007 IFP Narrative Rough Cut Labs. He is currently working toward his MFA at Temple University.

  • Share/Bookmark
Posted in BTS audience biz festivals narrative screening

lance weiler is the founder of the WorkBook Project and also a story architect of film, tv and games. He's written and directed two feature films THE LAST BROADCAST and HEAD TRAUMA. He's currently developing a number of transmedia projects

RELATED
  • this conference is being recorded – Brian Newman
    Today our guest is Brian Newman. Brian is the executive director of Renew Media (formerly NVR). Prior to joining Renew, Brian served as executive director of IMAGE Film & Video. Renew Media supports media artists & advocates on their behalf, connects audiences with independent films and contributes to the media arts field, via innovative programs and direct cash support.… read more
  • this conference is being recorded – Ken Eklund a social change ARG
    Today we are joined by writer and game designer Ken Eklund. Over the past 20 years Ken has been writing and designing games. His most recent game World Without Oil, was an ITVS funded ARG (alternate reality games) about a future oil shock. WWO is the first ARG designed to create a dialog about our dependency on oil and… read more
  • this conference is being recorded – Paul Pod
    Our guest today is Paul Pod, founder of Tape It Off The Internet (TIOTI). TIOTI targets lovers of TV shows and creates a social layer that allows viewers to discover and share media. The concept of social discovery around media is an important trend to follow, especially when it comes to bringing one’s work to an audience. For more… read more
By lance weiler, January 21st, 2008

The news of deals being struck is beginning to filter out of Park City. But behind the deal making that has become legendary is the reality of having to deliver the film. Long after the buzz has dwindled producers will start the long haul of delivery. For some outlets it can be minor but for others it can be a labyrinth that will take money from you at every turn.

It tends to be a dry subject but is critical to the sale and distribution of your film. This is especially true if you intend to have some type of traditional theatrical, VOD, TV or foreign distribution. Tani Cohen is an established producer who has delivered numerous narrative and documentary films. This is the first in a series of articles that will attempt to demystify the delivery process.

Tani reports – What is required for delivering your film can vary from company to company. Some smaller companies may require as few as a dozen items where the studios can demand anywhere from 40 to 75 items. The best thing a filmmaker can do is be vigilant while making their film. If possible, the first thing you want to do is hire a production attorney and have them review all the possible documents you may need to compile over the course of production and post. Have your production attorney do as many of the agreements as possible. If you cannot afford an attorney, at the least, try to have an attorney review whatever agreements you create (writer, director, actors, crew deals…)

I think what often happens is that pre-production and production can be so all consuming that things can easily slip through the cracks and then months later (when you are fortunate enough to be in a position to deliver your film), you are scrambling to gather all the documents required.

Another important thing to do is have a script clearance report done before you start shooting. This is a service that will read and break down the script and flag any items that may present a legal conflict. This can include character names, locations, artwork, music, copyrighted material, and product identification… Usually the report will recommend changes and contact information to obtain the proper legal clearances.

Your production coordinator should keep files of all these agreements and build a production folder as part of their wrap. Of course there are many post-production requirements that will be required and usually your post-production supervisor (or you) will track these items.

In additional to the legal delivery items, you will deliver your film and sound elements. Delivery requirements can range from a 35mm answer print to a digital master (or both) depending if you finish on film or a digital format. The film items can include your original picture negative, interpositive, internegaive, optical soundtrack negative and your soundtrack masters. Depending on the company, they will give you specs of what digital format they want and how they want the master delivered, along with the audio specs. There are a variation of sound elements and audio technical specs that may be required; again it depends on the company and format required.

Below is a list of 40 plus possible legal delivery requirements; (They are broken down by items that can be compiled during production, postproduction and/or both.)

LEGAL DELIVERY ITEMS

PRODUCTION

1. WRITERS AGREEMENT
2. UNDERLYING RIGHTS AGREEMENT (chain of title documents)
3. FORM PA (US copyright registration form)
4. SCRIPT CLEARANCE REPORT
5. FORMATION OF PRODUCTION COMPANY DOCUMENT
6. DGA AND WGA SIGNATORY AGREEMENTS (if applicable)
7. SAG SIGNATORY AGREEMENT
8. PRINCIPAL CAST AGREEMENTS
9. SUPPORTING CAST AND DAY PLAYER SAG AGREEMENTS
10.ACTOR PREMIERE AND PHOTO CLEARANCE OBLIGATION STATEMENT
11. DUBBING RESTRICTIONS
12. PAID AD STATEMENT
13. RESIDUAL OBLIGATION STATEMENT
14. DIRECTOR AGREEMENT
15. PRODUCER AGREEMENT
16. STUNT AGREEMENTS
17. KEY CREW AGREEMENTS
18. CREW DEAL MEMOS
19. IA SIGNATORY AGREEMENT (if applicable)
20. SCRIPT SUPERVISOR LOG
21. LOCATION AGREEMENTS
22. ART CLEARANCE AGREEMENTS
23. MISC VENDOR AGREEMENTS
24. BUDGET

PRODUCTION AND POST ITEMS

25. MAIN CREDITS
26. END CREDITS
27. BILLING BLOCK
28. PAID ADS STATEMENT
29. FINAL VENDOR LIST
30. COMPOSER AGREEMENT
31. VISUAL EFX AGREEMENT (if applicable)

POST ITEMS

32. EDITORS NOTES
33. MUSIC CUE SHEETS
34. MUSIC USE & SYNC LICENSE AGREEMENTS
35. SYNOPSIS & PRESS MATERIALS (including production still photographs)
36. FINAL COST REPORT
37. COPYRIGHT & TITLE REPORT
38. POST SOUND AGREEMENT
39. FINAL CONTINUITY LIST
40. DOLBY, DTS &/or SDDS AGREEMENTS
41. LAB ACCESS LETTER
42. MPAA RATING
43. E&O INSURANCE DOCUMENT

Tani Cohen recently produced, the HBO feature documentary, “Mr. Conservative: Goldwater on Goldwater.” The film was released on DVD through Zeitgeist Films. Prior credits include the MGM released feature film, “The Dust Factory” starring Hayden Panettiere and Armin Mueller-Stahl. Cohen executive produced the Emmy nominated Showtime feature “Snow in August” adapted and directed by Richard Friedenberg. Cohen’s many producing credits include, “Inside Monkey Zetterland”, “The Souler Opposite”, “How to Kill Your Neighbor’s Dog”, “Forever Lulu” and “Guinevere.” Cohen is currently producing Dylan Otto’s “Listen” with director Valerie Landsburg and “The Great Divide” based on T. Davis Bunn’s best selling novel.

  • Share/Bookmark
Posted in BTS biz deals delivery distro doc dvd festivals how to legal narrative resource theatrical tv

lance weiler is the founder of the WorkBook Project and also a story architect of film, tv and games. He's written and directed two feature films THE LAST BROADCAST and HEAD TRAUMA. He's currently developing a number of transmedia projects

RELATED
  • twitter
  • facebook
  • delicious
  • youtube
  • vimeo

Join the WorkBook Project mailing list - enter your email below...

WORKBOOK PROJECT flickr
DIY Days: Town Hall PanelDIY Days: Town Hall PanelDIY Days: Town Hall PanelDIY Days: Town Hall PanelDIY Days: Town Hall PanelDIY Days: Town Hall PanelDIY Days: Town Hall PanelDIY Days: Town Hall PanelDIY Days: Town Hall Panel
WORKBOOK PROJECT twitter
READ

There are no events to show at this time.

Podcast Archive