By Lance Weiler, September 25th, 2010

The Open Video Conference returns to NYC with a stop at FIT for two days of conference Oct 1st and 2nd and a special hack day on Oct 3rd. We caught up with Ben Moskowitz who’s pulling the event together to get a better sense of what to expect.

WorkBook Project: What is OVC and what’s new this year?

Ben Moskowitz: OVC is a two-day gathering for anyone who’s interested in the future of web video. The event draws a big and diverse crowd of businesspeople, technologists, lawyers, academics, artists and others. At one level it’s a showcase for creative and technical innovation in online video, especially some of the exciting things happening with HTML5 and open video. But we also grapple with some larger questions—with so much free content out there, how will artists get paid? Who decides what you watch? Who knows what you watch? We are very much about the top-level concerns of this emerging web video medium, the web, and the mass media system generally.

OVC is presented by the Open Video Alliance, which is a coalition of organizations and individuals building open tools, policies, and practices for web video. This is the second time we’ve produced OVC. This year’s event is bigger, featuring a small film festival and hack day. But on a deeper level, what’s new this year is that HTML5 video and open video generally are really picking up industry support, and lightbulbs are beginning to go off in people’s heads. So some of the really advanced stuff that we’ve been forecasting and building toward is becoming tangible. OVC is a great place to get a peek at some of that stuff.

WBP What’s the most pressing issue facing Open Video and why?

BM: At OVC we’re interested in all facets of web video. To have an “open” video ecosystem, we’re going to need to ensure that creativity is compensated; that the software and hardware tools for making and watching video are accessible and widely distributed; that the network for delivering video is open to all producers, big and small; and that public policy supports the ability of mass numbers of people to participate in the video conversation.

We’re discussing all of this at OVC, and it’s all important.

WBP: HTML5 what’s it mean to storytellers and what are some of the exciting things you’ve seen done with it? Any examples you can share?

BM: Mozilla is opening an HTML5 video workshop to show what’s possible when video is woven into web pages. It’s much different than simply “embedding” a video—it’s experimenting with the possibilities of connecting video to the rest of the web, and really embracing new ideas about interactivity and iterability.

There’s the popcorn.js demo floating around, which pulls live-updating data from across the web and displays it along with the video. But that’s early stage stuff. There are lots of cool concepts which show users interacting and manipulating video in real time. It’s not just about augmenting the viewing experience—it’s about creating new experiences which weren’t possible until now. Check out the Arcade Fire HTML5 music video, “The Wilderness Inside.” In fact, do a Google search for “HTML5 video demo” and you’ll see all sorts of possibilities; when you realize that creators will be able to tinker with and build upon these examples in mass experimentation, your head will spin.

Of course, all the tech demos and gadgetry are nothing unless they’re in service of a great story. One of the coolest things to see at OVC is open source developers and creatives putting their heads together to imagine how the web can advance the craft of storytelling. We will have some cool stuff to show, for sure. But I don’t want to spoil the surprise.

But beyond that, the energy at OVC is infectious. It’s a meeting of the minds and people will be pitching new ideas all weekend. We’re delighted to be working with over 15 organizations, including the visionaries at the Workbook Project.

WBP: You’re adding a hack day this year can you explain the reason and what will be taking place?

BM: The hack day is free and open to the public. We’re organizing the hack day so everyone will have a space to start executing on their ideas immediately after the conference.

It’s taking place at NYU’s Interactive Telecommunications Program at 721 Broadway. Though it’s an open space gathering, we have some confirmed activities: a Mozilla WebMadeMovies working group; Kaltura hackathon; a working group with WITNESS on building solutions for human rights video; and a lot more. For the folks working on the fundamental mechanics of web video, we have the highly technical Foundations of Open Media Software Workshop.

But anyone with a project is welcome to come and collaborate—it’s going to be fun.

WBP: What tech do you think is exciting right now?

BM: Beyond the possibilities of HTML5 video, I’m really interested in how video on open knowledge projects like Wikipedia can improve learning, And generally speaking, the expanding universe of tools for making and sharing video—from the capture end all the way up to cloud computing resources—is really amazing to consider.

———–

If you’re interested in new forms of storytelling, technology, policy issues or just want to catch a glimpse of some innovative projects make sure to attend OVC.

Discount available for WorkBook Project community…

Register now— they’re filling up. It’s a great deal, with 60+ sessions, screenings, parties, and more. For readers of WBP use this discount code FILM20

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Posted in community cross-media crowdsourcing event storytelling transmedia video

Lance Weiler is the founder of the WorkBook Project and also a story architect of film, tv and games. He's written and directed two feature films THE LAST BROADCAST and HEAD TRAUMA. He's currently developing a number of transmedia projects.

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By robert pratten, September 24th, 2010

Welcome to Transmedia Talk a new podcast covering all things story. Transmedia Talk is co-hosted by Nick Braccia and Robert Pratten and looks to shed light on the topic of transmedia storytelling with commentary, interviews and tips on how storytelling is moving into the 21st century.

Download Adobe Flash Player.

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Or Subscribe iTunes

NB: If you’d like to give us feedback, recommend yourself as a guest or suggest topics to cover – please email us at talk@workbookproject.com or Tweet away with the hashtag #tmediatalk

Topics cover in this episode (start time shown in bold)

01:14 Collaborative storytelling and world-building with Scott Walker of Brain Candy LLC (with reference to Scott’s property The Runes of Gallidon

34:45 The Webishades mini-ARG from NoMinesMedia

Hosts

Nick Braccia from Culture Hacker
Robert Pratten from TransmediaStoryteller.com

Guests
Scott Walker from Brain Candy LLC
Haley Moore from Culture Hacker
Dee Cook from Dog Tale Media

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Posted in ARG Transmedia Talk cross-media design experience gaming podcast storytelling transmedia

robert pratten Robert Pratten is CEO and Founder of Transmedia Storyteller Ltd, an audience engagement company and provider of Conducttr, an pervasive entertainment platform. He has more than 20 years experience as an international marketing consultant and has established himself as a thought-leader in the field of transmedia storytelling. He is author of the first practical book transmedia storytelling: Getting Started in Transmedia Storytelling: A Practical Guide for Beginners. http://twitter.com/robpratten

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By Janine Saunders, September 14th, 2010

Dutch media innovators Bruno Felix and Femke Wolting, co-founders of Submarine.com, collaborated to produce Submarinechannel.com, an initiative designed to explore and promote innovative approaches to media. Submarinechannel.com positions itself as both a distribution and production platform for artists looking to create interactive, cross-media projects.

Both Felix and Wolting previously worked at Dutch Broadcasting Organization, VPRO, in the 1990’s, an experimental period in the industry. Felix is credited with the development of new media strategy for VPRO during this time, and both are recognized as early moguls for new media. Their devotion to creating interactive relationships between media and consumer inspired Submarine.com, which ultimately led to the birth of Submarinechannel.com. The site highlights creative participation in various projects and films, and aims to question the multicultural and multifaceted digital identity of the Internet.  The content highlighted relies on new modes of storytelling to break down the barrier currently separating arts, media, and politics.

United Vloggers, the guide for understanding the nature of vlogs, is a feature under the tab “Internet” on the site. Introduced in 2007 by Michael Schaap to support vloggers, the project quickly became a catalyst for connecting talent on a global scale.  UnitedVloggers filters out quality vlogs and the selection varies from video art to grass roots journalism. Check out the recently posted “Touch My Body” a project where music videos are manipulated into green screens and posted on youtube.com for viewers to respond.

Navigate through Chunks under Film on Submarinechannel.com, the channel’s personal 24/7 online film festival featuring picks from all over the world; there are currently more than 50 to browse through. Another cool project about to debut is Collapsus, their upcoming project that epitomizes the site’s aim to broach the integral nature of global perspectives in digital culture.

Tommy Pallotta, renowned for blending technology, filmmaking, and animation, directs the project. Pallotta produced Waking Life, the groundbreaking computer animated feature film.

Collapsus places the viewer as director in an interactive, documentary-esque, animated film, replete with political agendas surrounding the future global energy crisis.  As an active participant in the story, the viewer is required to take action in seeking solutions to the energy crisis; with each decisive click of the mouse the narrative changes to present viewers with varying futuristic crisis scenarios.

Submarinechannel.com hopes to instigate thought, but similarly looks to inspire artists working in every medium. The innovative site also features projects like DUTCH PROFILES, where viewers can learn about innovative projects at the heart of Dutch culture, in a documentary series featuring interviews with various designers in the region. Some other well known projects include: Minimovies, documentaries for the digital age. Sneakers: a guided tour through sneaker culture. Pretty Cool People Interviews: video interviews with creators. The Killer: Motion comic based on graphic novel by Matz and Jacamon.

Ultimately, Submarinechannel.com is an incredible source for those looking to further experiment with the potential of the Internet. Well-curated posts and projects permeate the website, and validate the portal as a content rich aggregator for projects aimed at young audiences ripe with global perspectives on digital culture.

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Posted in ARG cross-media design storytelling television transmedia

Janine Saunders is a producer, media collaborator, and DJ living in NYC.  She has worked as a producer since a very early age, in music, video and publishing. She has worked closely with writer/ documentarian/ graphic novelist Douglas Rushkoff, and directed and edited Life Inc: The Movie.

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By robert pratten, September 12th, 2010

Welcome to Transmedia Talk a new podcast covering all things story. Transmedia Talk is co-hosted by Nick Braccia and Robert Pratten and looks to shed light on the topic of transmedia storytelling with commentary, interviews and tips on how storytelling is moving into the 21st century.

This episode is in TWO parts

PART ONE:
Download Adobe Flash Player.

download

PART TWO:
Download Adobe Flash Player.

download

Or Subscribe iTunes

NB: If you’d like to give us feedback, recommend yourself as a guest or suggest topics to cover – please email us at talk@workbookproject.com or Tweet away with the hashtag #tmediatalk

Topics cover in this episode (start time shown in bold)

PART ONE (47 mins)
Audience building:
01:04 Stephen King’s The Dark Tower,
02:53 Fallout New Vegas iPhone App
05:46 Savage County

09:51 Pervasive Games – JeJune Institute and Nonchalance [Jeff Hull will be speaking at TedxSOMA]

29:34 Mongoliad - collaborative storytelling

PART TWO (40 mins)
0:00 Dexter ARG

Hosts
Nick Braccia from Culture Hacker
Robert Pratten from TransmediaStoryteller.com

Guests
Jeffery Hull from Nonchalance
Jeremy Bornstein from Subutai Corp
Haley Moore from Culture Hacker
Dee Cook from Dog Tale Media

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Posted in ARG Transmedia Talk events experience experimental gaming movies storytelling television transmedia

robert pratten Robert Pratten is CEO and Founder of Transmedia Storyteller Ltd, an audience engagement company and provider of Conducttr, an pervasive entertainment platform. He has more than 20 years experience as an international marketing consultant and has established himself as a thought-leader in the field of transmedia storytelling. He is author of the first practical book transmedia storytelling: Getting Started in Transmedia Storytelling: A Practical Guide for Beginners. http://twitter.com/robpratten

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